Unbundling Toolkit v1.0 Now Available!

We have reached two important milestones in the unbundled legal services adventure (in partnership with Access to Justice BC):

  • Publication of a Toolkit for Lawyers and Paralegals (version 1.0); and
  • An invitation to receive more information about the BC Family Unbundling Roster

The Toolkit version 1.0

Toolbox by Florian RichterDuring the surveys and interviews with family lawyers and paralegals, we heard time and time again that lawyers are interested in providing unbundled legal services to families but need a more structured approach to integrating unbundled services into their practice. They wanted simple, concrete tools, best practice guidelines, how to guides and, in particular, templates.

We are extremely pleased to advise that, as part of a partnership with Courthouse Libraries BC (CLBC), version 1.0 of the Toolkit for Lawyers and Paralegals has now been posted! We are extremely grateful to CLBC for their expert and timely assistance.

Here is the index of materials in the Toolkit:

  1. An introduction about how to use the Toolkit
  2. Law Society of BC Code of Conduct Rules
  3. Best Practices for Unbundling
  4. Unbundling FAQs for Lawyers
  5. List of Resources
  6. How to use the retainer letter templates
  7. Retainer letter: One-time consultation
  8. Retainer letter: Ongoing consultation
  9. Schedule A – full list
  10. Schedule A – example of drafting documents
  11. Schedule A – example of coaching for mediation
  12. Flowchart for Lawyers
  13. Flowchart for Clients
  14. Client Intake for Unbundling

This is version 1.0 because we are still working on enhancing the existing materials and adding new ones. To do this we need your help! Please take a look, try them out and provide us with your feedback.

The BC Family Unbundling Roster

BC family lawyers, family mediators and, in particular, the public, told us that they did not know how to find lawyers willing to provide unbundled legal services.  Many suggested a free public-facing list or roster that was hosted in a central place.

We are excited to announce that we are working with the CLBC to create such a roster which will reside on the Clicklaw site – easily accessible to the public and the legal community. The roster itself is under construction but, in the meantime, we invite you to click here to indicate your interest in this important tool. We will let you know as soon as the application form is ready.

As an added bonus, you have the option of agreeing to have your name and contact information shared with, and included in, a Canadian national database of lawyers providing unbundled legal services of all types. This national database is published by the National Self-Represented Litigants Project led by Dr. Julie Macfarlane. Inclusion in this database will give you and your firm national exposure to families seeking unbundled legal services for BC-related matters.

Unbundling and the national database were recently showcased in a NSRLP video featuring BC’s Chief Justice Bauman. In addition, we recommend that you read Chief Justice Bauman’s newest blog post on unbundling.

Please let us know if you have questions or need more information about this exciting initiative.

Kari D. Boyle
Project Manager, BC Family Unbundled Legal Services Project
Mediate BC

Image Credit: Florian Richter | Flickr cc

Top 5 Reasons to Work with a Conflict Coach

Ugh. Another day at the office.

How many of your workers feel like this before coming to work? Many leaders and their employees go to work daily worrying about unresolved conflict. One study found that 85% of employees have to deal with conflict to some degree and 36% also spend a significant amount of time managing disputes.

The costs of unresolved conflict in the workplace are innumerable. From lower employee engagement and productivity and higher absenteeism, to loss of customers, as outward-facing employees experiencing stress and conflict often are not capable of representing your business in its best light.

Often it’s leaders who bear the brunt and carry the burden of conflict.

According to a recent Globe and Mail article, “Leaders who lack conflict management skills and avoid conflict often end up being less effective at achieving their defined business objectives, have more trouble managing people and being fulfilled by their job.”

Conflict Coaching to the rescue!

What is “Conflict Coaching”?

Geschftsleute halten zwei groe PuzzleteileConflict coaching emerged from the executive coaching and conflict resolution fields, as practitioners explored ways to support individual clients who were troubled by a specific conflict or seeking enhanced “conflict competency” – the ability to communicate and manage conflict. Pioneers like Cinnie Noble, Tricia Jones and Ross Binkert led the way, merging their expertise in conflict resolution – including third-party led methods like mediation – with individual-focused executive coaching that supports individuals in expanding their workplace competencies.

Conflict coaching is typically a one-on-one process, focused on individual goals and conflict management needs. Client goals might include enhancing conflict competency, integrating learning from conflict resolution training, or preparing for a difficult conflict conversation, or a more formal conflict resolution process such as mediation.

Effective leaders have high conflict competency, respond to pressures and change more constructively, build more productive teams and help create a positive work environment.

Top 5 Reasons to Work with a Conflict Coach

 

1. Hone your conflict competency and be a more effective leader.

Develop positive and productive conflict management skills. Increase your understanding of conflict dynamics and your awareness of your own conflict style. Learn how to mitigate the impact of conflict and manage conflict in more constructive and collaborative ways. Your coach will guide you through competency development.

2. You have unresolved conflict.

Your coach will help you analyze the conflict situation and develop a strategy for resolving or managing the conflict and build your problem-solving skills. Clients report increased confidence when supported by a conflict coach.

3. You are going to mediation.

Conflict coaching can help you prepare for mediation, during the mediation from behind-the-scenes, and after the mediation. Your coach will help you identify your goals for the mediation, and how to achieve them.

4. You want to integrate conflict resolution training.

Research shows that ROI on training is increased by up to 500% when training is coupled with or followed by one-on-one or group coaching.

5. Conflict Coaching benefits everyone.

Learning how to manage conflict effectively – rather than reacting to conflict in negative or potentially destructive ways – benefits the coaching client, and everyone the client deals with! Organizations benefit when their employees and leaders enhance their conflict competency.

Conflict coaching is dynamic and flexible, and is available to individuals one-on-one, and to groups and teams.

Carrie Gallant

Carrie Gallant

Carrie Gallant is an lawyer, Executive Coach  and Enhanced Conversational Intelligence Coach®. She is also a Mediate BC Civil Roster mediator, teacher and trainer. Carrie’s expertise in negotiation, conflict management and career counselling provides a rich foundation to her passion for helping others uncover what really matters and solve problems creatively. For more information, please contact carrie@gallantsolutionsinc.com.

 

Conflict Resolution Week 2016

 

Facilitators at the Heart of the Civil Resolution Tribunal

The Civil Resolution Tribunal (CRT) has posted for multiple positions as Case Managers and Senior Case Managers – an exciting development!

Civil Resolution TribunalShould people need assistance in resolving their conflicts beyond the self-help Solution Explorer, they then have the option of engaging with a facilitator.

These new roles facilitate discussions and pursue consensual resolution of the identified issues, and where necessary prepare people for adjudication and determine the method of the hearing, and make final decisions. These roles present excellent options for experienced civil and strata mediators.

Facilitators are at the heart of the CRT’s goal of building justice processes around the needs of the public. CRT facilitators support and empower those with conflicts to find consensual resolutions which work for everyone.

– Shannon Salter, Chair of the Civil Resolution Tribunal

Applications for full-time positions with the CRT must be received by 11:59 PM on Tuesday, November 22.

For more information about the positions and how to apply, click the links below.

This is an exciting development with the CRT and the role mediators will play in providing high quality dispute resolution services to the public in BC.